Cows with Names Make More Milk

Klautermauffen

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Hmm...

Genes predict response to leukemia treatment


NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Researchers have identified numerous genetic variants that may help predict the response to treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090127/hl_nm/us_genes_predict;_ylt=AhInIriCOK303wK7fDNJHdkPLBIF


Ah, but we wouldn't want to remove that possibility from an embryo or perhaps try for a 'healthier' embryo NOT predisposed to something like childhood cancer.

...cuz we'll love the child the same as we would another child.

Perhaps raising children might have more to do with them and not you? Perhaps a person might not want to be born into a life of childhood pain and 70% chance of not even making it to a 5th birthday. Perhaps they might not want their legacy to their parents to be a crushing medical tab that was all for naught anyway.
___________________________

This thread is free fire zone instead "from the news desk" so you can add whatever opinions, commentary, or random shit you'd like as well. Enjoy :)
 

Klautermauffen

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Drinking coffee reduces risk of Alzheimer's: study AFP - Thu Jan 15, 10:45 AM ET STOCKHOLM (AFP) - Middle-aged people who drink moderate amounts of coffee significantly reduce their risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, a study by Finnish and Swedish researchers showed Thursday.




Suppose I'll quote this from now on.



"Gosh, you drink too much coffee."
"At least I won't have alzheimers."
"I'm sorry, what'd you say?"
"See."
 

Klautermauffen

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Land it in the Hudson
January 27
An expression used to encourage yourself or someone else when it appears an endeavor is headed for a disastrous outcome (due mostly to external conditions). Based on when Sully averted tragedy by successfully landing US Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River. See also, "Land it like Sully."

default potential
January 26
A self-portrait or a picture with you in it that has the potential to be your default image on myspace/facebook etc.
This picture is so good, TOTAL default potential!

transaction
January 24
The sex you get from a crossdresser.
Man, that girl I met at the bar last night was really a dude. It's okay, I got me some sweet transaction.

^^D'oh!


Brodown
January 22
n. Boys night out.

As in a Hodown, but with your bros.
Sorry baby, it's a brodown tonight.

^^ boys' night in, watching Bromance.


Mall Feet
January 18
The condition of having unusually intense aches and pains in the feet due to exposure to shopping malls. Most commonly presented in males, presumably due to two factors. First, there is an inherent inability to withstand the excess gravity resulting from the densely packed merchandise. Second, females often burden males with the charge of carrying gratuitous quantities of purchases far greater than the typical wallet loading.

There is no cure, though treatments may include reclining chairs and bottled beverages.
"Honey, you don't need any more bags. Let's go. I'm really tired, and I've had mall feet since the food court."



trusticles
January 12
Having the balls to trust someone in a difficult situation.
 

Titty

Proud White Boy
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Mar 2, 2008
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Where the sun doesn't shine
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Researchers have identified numerous genetic variants that may help predict the response to treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
This information is somewhat misleading. While certain genetic markers may be indicative of a predisposition toward treatment response, many other factors more directly and acutely influence reaction to medicinal therapy.

Age; race; extent of disease progression before diagnosis; symptoms displayed; involvement (or absence) of Central Nervous System infiltration; cellular precursor (B or T cell); or other outstanding ailments and/or systemic considerations are but a handful of potential determinants that contribute to prognosis and course of treatment.

In addition, methodology is a major precipitant to the degree of complications and overall success of therapy.

Bear in mind the statistics given in that article regarding survival rates make no distinction between deaths due to lack of response to treatment and those either directly or indirectly resulting from the treatment itself.


Ah, but we wouldn't want to remove that possibility from an embryo or perhaps try for a 'healthier' embryo NOT predisposed to something like childhood cancer.

...cuz we'll love the child the same as we would another child.

Perhaps raising children might have more to do with them and not you? Perhaps a person might not want to be born into a life of childhood pain and 70% chance of not even making it to a 5th birthday. Perhaps they might not want their legacy to their parents to be a crushing medical tab that was all for naught anyway.
{not directed at anyone in particular}

There seem to be some ubiquitous misconceptions regarding cancer. People tend to use the term to encompass what are actually hundreds of vastly different and mostly unrelated diseases.

There is no "cancer gene", as some would like to believe. Any individual may develop any of the myriad forms of cancer at any given moment. Genetics are not necessarily the sole prognosticator. Environmental influences and exposures; diet; immune deficiencies; and viruses have all been linked to cancer.

Several genetic mutations must take place for cancer to occur. Possession of a genetic abnormality (congenital or otherwise) doesn't necessarily dictate one will contract a disease. Mutations must be allowed to proliferate through failure of our bodies natural ability to prevent such instances from transpiring. Again this may happen for a multitude of reasons.


The overwhelming perception is that a diagnosis of childhood cancer signals an insufferable life of agony and misery. One for which the parents selfishly choose to imperil and mutilate their child in a desperate bid to cling to them like a prized possession; inconsiderate of the consequences and what torment they might endure. These views are not only exceedingly inaccurate, they're dangerously ignorant.

On January 31, 2006 my youngest son was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. This followed a sequence of events, that through our diligence and attentiveness as parents, led us to enable him to receive timely diagnosis and treatment, with a highly favorable prognosis. To downplay the entire experience and proclaim it's been a walk in the park would be an outright lie. Yet, to say he's spent the last 3 years suffering is, by his own accounts, erroneous as well.

Leukemia, in an overly-simplified annotation, is an overabundance of immature white blood cells produced in the body's bone marrow. Allowed to continue unchecked, these cells eventually overrun the body, displacing essential constituents of the blood(red cells, properly functioning white cells, platelets, etc). Organs are essentially starved. You asphyxiate.

Typical treatment varies depending upon the sub-type and other factors listed in the second paragraph above. However, many children experience no more than minor side-effects-- if any-- and essentially lead a normal life. Aside from a dual strep/staph infection acquired during his initial hospital stay, my son has never complained of any pain, discomfort or distress associated with his ailment and subsequent treatment. Opportunistic infections remain the main threat due to the immuno-suppressant nature of his medicine. We are vigilant in avoiding and reducing exposure as a result.

He attends Kindergarten as any normal 5 year-old would. He perseveres unencumbered and uninhibited. He has no physical or mental limitations (just ask his 2 older brothers). Most people are completely unaware of his situation; as they should be, as the stigma attached to childhood cancer does not define him.

Does this exemplify every case? Certainly not. In our many trips to the Albany Children's Hospital, we've seen children confined to wheelchairs, too weak or unable to walk. We've witnessed parents taking their child home to die. But we've also seen an abundance of kids smiling, laughing and thriving despite their illness; almost in mockery of their situation. Quite often, we get to observe parent and child rejoice in the news they've finished treatment and should expect a long and fruitful life. For every sad story, there are a plethora with happy endings.

Aside from the emotional toll, what we have incurred thus far amounts to far less than the average individual spends on his or her daily vices. Not that any monetary expense would be too great.

Just to clarify that little factotum for some.




In closing, neither a potential predilection toward acquiring a disease, nor possible indicator of poor response to treatment of it, would alter my choice to continue with a pregnancy. Too many variables exist to use said knowledge with such discrimination.
 

Klautermauffen

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*lots of stuff*



In closing, neither a potential predilection toward acquiring a disease, nor possible indicator of poor response to treatment of it, would alter my choice to continue with a pregnancy. Too many variables exist to use said knowledge with such discrimination.
First off, thanks for such an in-depth response... and I'd have to say that for the most part, I agree with you.

However, I think there would be some couples who would want to screen for certain abnormalities, possible markers for certain diseases, etc. that may run in their families or may just concern them.

I would be one of those people. If they told me my little shrimp was probably going to be quite sick or was deformed, I would think seriously about trying for a healthier child.
 

Klautermauffen

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"I don't think anybody anticipated the breach of the levees." –President Bush, on "Good Morning America," Sept. 1, 2005, six days after repeated warnings from experts about the scope of damage expected from Hurricane Katrina





"What I'm hearing which is sort of scary is that they all want to stay in Texas. Everybody is so overwhelmed by the hospitality. And so many of the people in the arena here, you know, were underprivileged anyway so this (chuckle) – this is working very well for them." –Former First Lady Barbara Bush, on the Hurricane flood evacuees in the Houston Astrodome, Sept. 5, 2005





"We've got a lot of rebuilding to do ... The good news is — and it's hard for some to see it now — that out of this chaos is going to come a fantastic Gulf Coast, like it was before. Out of the rubbles of Trent Lott's house — he's lost his entire house — there's going to be a fantastic house. And I'm looking forward to sitting on the porch." (Laughter) —President Bush, touring hurricane damage, Mobile, Ala., Sept. 2, 2005





"Considering the dire circumstances that we have in New Orleans, virtually a city that has been destroyed, things are going relatively well." –FEMA Director Michael Brown, Sept. 1, 2005





"I have not heard a report of thousands of people in the convention center who don't have food and water." –Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, on NPR's "All Things Considered," Sept. 1, 2005





"You simply get chills every time you see these poor individuals...many of these people, almost all of them that we see are so poor and they are so black, and this is going to raise lots of questions for people who are watching this story unfold." –CNN's Wolf Blitzer, on New Orleans' hurricane evacuees, Sept. 1, 2005





"We finally cleaned up public housing in New Orleans. We couldn't do it, but God did." –Rep. Richard Baker (R-LA) to lobbyists, as quoted in the Wall Street Journal





"Louisiana is a city that is largely under water." –Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, news conference, Sept. 3, 2005





"I also want to encourage anybody who was affected by Hurricane Corina to make sure their children are in school." –First Lady Laura Bush, twice referring to a "Hurricane Corina" while speaking to children and parents in South Haven, Mississippi, Sept. 8, 2005





"It's totally wiped out. ... It's devastating, it's got to be doubly devastating on the ground." –President Bush, turning to his aides while surveying Hurricane Katrina flood damage from Air Force One, Aug. 31, 2005





"We just learned of the convention center – we being the federal government – today." –FEMA Director Michael Brown, to ABC's Ted Koppel, Sept. 1, 2005, to which Koppel responded " Don't you guys watch television? Don't you guys listen to the radio? Our reporters have been reporting on it for more than just today."
 

Klautermauffen

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Founder
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The Bacon-Off Rules

  • everybody brings 8 1lb packages of bacon, a skillet and a good attitude
  • you puke, you lose, loser.
  • turkey bacon is NOT bacon
  • bacon will not be cooked to order.
  • bacon is eaten in rounds
    • each round is one package of bacon
    • the first three rounds last five minutes each
    • each round after the third is five minutes longer than the previous
    • there is a 10 minute break between rounds
    • contestants may walk around between rounds
  • this is a drug-free event. no stoners with munchies.
  • ROAR

Awww... they created a sport just for lil ol kill