Info Freezing Shellfish & Fish?

Mamba

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May 22, 2008
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How long would you say you can safely freeze shellfish? I've had some fresh (cooked) shrimp in my freezer that I forgot about, I bought it at the end of August (28th) I heard you could only freeze safely for 3 months, but I wondered if any of you guys had kept shellfish a little bit longer and it was okay?

I'll probably end up throwing them out anyway, just curious. (I love shrimp and I'm kicking myself for forgetting about them!)

Also I have some Halibut that I bought around the same time, give or take a couple of days. Would that be okay to eat? I heard that fish lasts longer, especially lean fish?


Thanks!
 

Scarlet

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Mar 3, 2008
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One month for the shrimp and 2 months for the halibut.
Commercially frozen fish can last up to 12 months but a domestic fridge time is significantly less.
 

funeeman

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Actually if its done correctly Fish can be ok up to 24 months or more and shrimp around 18 months. Beef is ok up to 36 months. Thats in a vacum sealed manner. I know the fish I just bought that way has a expiration Jan 2010.

edit. . and thats fresh with no additives.
 

Klautermauffen

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I don't have a fancy shmancy vacuum seal thingy - but what we do that seems to work well is taking a gallon freezer bag, adding the fish, and then filling it completely with water to freeze. It's a big hunk of ice, but I've got a load of halibut and cod that I need to last awhile.

On topic: I would throw both out.
 

SittinGrumpy

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Everything I found when I googled said that as long as it doesn’t look freezer burnt and isn’t changing colors then it is fine.
 

Mamba

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May 22, 2008
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Actually if its done correctly Fish can be ok up to 24 months or more and shrimp around 18 months. Beef is ok up to 36 months. Thats in a vacum sealed manner. I know the fish I just bought that way has a expiration Jan 2010.

edit. . and thats fresh with no additives.
Well the shrimp I bought fresh with the shells on, then I put in a plastic bag and tied a knot and put it in the freezer. I know its not vacuum sealed, so I guess I better throw it out?

Thanks for this.

Josie, do you put the fish in a load of separate freezer bags or all in one? How does that work? My freezer isn't very big... and how to you defrost a big hunk of ice to get the fish... do you then need to refreeze the rest once defrosting? I'm new at this. :yociexp37:
 

funeeman

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Well the shrimp I bought fresh with the shells on, then I put in a plastic bag and tied a knot and put it in the freezer. I know its not vacuum sealed, so I guess I better throw it out?

Thanks for this.

Josie, do you put the fish in a load of separate freezer bags or all in one? How does that work? My freezer isn't very big... and how to you defrost a big hunk of ice to get the fish... do you then need to refreeze the rest once defrosting? I'm new at this. :yociexp37:
Actually you can do it the reverse too. Put the fish in a zip lock and submerge the bag (except the opening) in water pushing all the air out. Then seal it. It will create a cheap vacuum for your food.
 

Mamba

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May 22, 2008
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Actually you can do it the reverse too. Put the fish in a zip lock and submerge the bag (except the opening) in water pushing all the air out. Then seal it. It will create a cheap vacuum for your food.
Oh, thanks.
 

Klautermauffen

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Actually you can do it the reverse too. Put the fish in a zip lock and submerge the bag (except the opening) in water pushing all the air out. Then seal it. It will create a cheap vacuum for your food.
Ooooh! This is a much better idea.