Random Thing That's Pissing Me Off Today

Kill_em_All

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Jul 29, 2008
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I have this client. They're an auto body shop. I signed them for a 12-month advertising campaign on the local Fox affiliate, KTVI. They agreed to run the twelve weeks spread out over the course of eleven months.

So for February and March, their schedule looks like this...


February: Air weeks 2-16-09 through 2-22-09, and 2-23-09 through 3-1-09.

They've been on air a grand total of one and a half air weeks, 35 times.

Now keep in mind, this company hasn't done any television advertising ever, and they're also about 75 miles from the metro area in a small town.

So I get a phone call today from the owner of the company telling me how it "isn't working" and "wants to film an entirely new commercial".

I'm like, "Um...................you've been on air a total of a week and a half. You can't expect foot traffic to increase exponentially in a fucking week and a half."

Now he wants to pull out of the contract. I, politely, informed him that he signed a contract which runs for 12 weeks and he's in week two and if the only way out of that contract is to pay off the remainder of it ($23,500), or be in breech of contract, face litigation, and still have to pay the 23 grand on top of legal fees. OR, he could continue paying me $2,250 dollars a month, run the remaining ads, get some new business, make some money, and contribute to the local economy.

Well the idiot decided to pay off the contract and cancel service.

I seriously don't understand people. This guy could have made a fortune, saved some money, and become well-known but instead opted to lose a huge chunk of change, not get the exposure, and look like a dumbfuck.

It's idiots like this who make me question Midwestern mentality and will eventually lead me to move to the West Coast.

On the plus side, I'm up 23k.

/rant
 

Lethal_Lefty

[P]resident
Jan 12, 2009
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OK, so the guy went ahead and paid the money that he was going to pay anyway up front with the intention of you pulling his commercials?

What kind of backwards fucking logic is that?

If he'd already resigned himself to paying the total amount he should have just let the ad campaign run its course...

...this completely un-needed "revelation" was brought to you by:
 

Bunnee

*gigglesnorts*
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Apr 25, 2008
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Orstrayleeuh
Hrmmm.....20++ grand vs someone's impatience.

Somehow I just can't see how this should upset you OR warrant a rant thread..

I would rather devote my time bragging about it.
 

SlimSkeeter

Guest
Hrmmm.....20++ grand vs someone's impatience.

Somehow I just can't see how this should upset you OR warrant a rant thread..

I would rather devote my time bragging about it.
Its because Kill has pride in his job and these guys showing no faith in what he does for a living prolly bruises his ego a touch. I feel the same way when I get "helped" by my boss at work, which usually ends up with me working twice as hard to not only fix what he broke, but to fix what was originally wrong.
 

Kill_em_All

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Jul 29, 2008
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Its because Kill has pride in his job and these guys showing no faith in what he does for a living prolly bruises his ego a touch. I feel the same way when I get "helped" by my boss at work, which usually ends up with me working twice as hard to not only fix what he broke, but to fix what was originally wrong.
You're pretty close.

It's not an ego thing, or really even a pride thing, either. The fact is, my company helps businesses and the economy. I work exclusively with small businesses, start-ups, not-for-profits, etc. The program that I have gives an opportunity to very small companies to compete on the same level as giant corporations when they otherwise might not. The domino effect from what I do is tremendous and helps to stimulate local commerce. When I see a business fail to realize the value in what we're trying to accomplish, it bothers me. It bothers me because I know that by losing a client, the domino effect reverses and more than just myself and my client lose.

Beyond that, it makes me question my ability in the form of "what could I have possibly done different".
 

funeeman

Spank Me!
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Mar 3, 2008
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North Main Street
You're pretty close.

It's not an ego thing, or really even a pride thing, either. The fact is, my company helps businesses and the economy. I work exclusively with small businesses, start-ups, not-for-profits, etc. The program that I have gives an opportunity to very small companies to compete on the same level as giant corporations when they otherwise might not. The domino effect from what I do is tremendous and helps to stimulate local commerce. When I see a business fail to realize the value in what we're trying to accomplish, it bothers me. It bothers me because I know that by losing a client, the domino effect reverses and more than just myself and my client lose.

Beyond that, it makes me question my ability in the form of "what could I have possibly done different".
Each market is slightly different, but you'll never catch me advertising in a TV commercial. They cost too much and the local production always looks second best to the national advertising. Plus there's too many channels out there so chances are you're missed by most of your customers.

I'm assuming you do more than sell just TV but focus on a media mix. If I remember correctly you said once you sell all the left over air times at a reduced rate. While it benefits the customer by saving him money on air time. . its not necessarily effective either. Those are often shit times to be broadcasting. That dude would have been better off to spend that 23 grand on cheap ass billboards, a postcard mailer and targeted specialized radio and TV such as sponsoring the weather at 6 and 10. That shits cheap to do and you get better exposure. He'd have even been well off to advertise in the local "auto trader" free circular that's at all the gas stations.
 

Kill_em_All

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Jul 29, 2008
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Each market is slightly different, but you'll never catch me advertising in a TV commercial. They cost too much and the local production always looks second best to the national advertising. Plus there's too many channels out there so chances are you're missed by most of your customers.
Not the case. I have a contracted production house that is a national company and our spots look just as good (better in some cases) than a Lowe's or Home Depot or the like. And I sell exclusively for the number one rated television station in both markets which I work (KTVI in St. Louis and WDAF in KC). All of the other stations in both markets are down in ratings and those two are the only which are up (coincidentally, they're both Fox affiliates). Beyond that, I have a relationship with Fox Sports Net and have just recently put together a package to run during Cardinal Baseball, which blankets a 5-state area.

I'm assuming you do more than sell just TV but focus on a media mix.
Nope. Television exclusively. I don't have to sell any other forms. My company has more businesses on television in STL and KC than any other independant ad agency in either market. Radio is inferior to television and don't even get me started on print. You'd have to advertise on all 7 of the top rated radio stations in my markets SIMULTANEOUSLY to get as much penetration into the market as running one schedule on either of my networks. Print isn't even in the same race. Newspapers and trade publications are the fucking Special Olympics of the advertising world and I don't fuck with em.

If I remember correctly you said once you sell all the left over air times at a reduced rate.
Not at all. The airtimes I push are nowhere near "left over". What I do is simple....

I buy airtime directly from the station at cost, just like any other business that advertises does. That airtime is bought in :30 second intervals, and during premier programming (news, prime, daytime rotation, etc).

What I then do is approach small businesses to buy half of those 30-second blocks :)15 seconds). I pair up non-competing businesses to run back to back within those 30-second blocks of airtime.

So how do I make money?

Simple; If a 30 second block of airtime over the course of a year costs 30 grand, I divide those blocks in two, and charge 18 grand to two businesses, thus making myself a cool six grand (minus production fees) on the back end for doing little more than convincing a business that television is the best vehicle to advertise (which isn't hard to do, because it is).

That dude would have been better off to spend that 23 grand on cheap ass billboards, a postcard mailer and targeted specialized radio and TV such as sponsoring the weather at 6 and 10. That shits cheap to do and you get better exposure. He'd have even been well off to advertise in the local "auto trader" free circular that's at all the gas stations.
There is no better form of advertising than television. Period. That's why it's so expensive.
 

funeeman

Spank Me!
Founder
Mar 3, 2008
586
1
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45
North Main Street
Not the case. I have a contracted production house that is a national company and our spots look just as good (better in some cases) than a Lowe's or Home Depot or the like. And I sell exclusively for the number one rated television station in both markets which I work (KTVI in St. Louis and WDAF in KC). All of the other stations in both markets are down in ratings and those two are the only which are up (coincidentally, they're both Fox affiliates). Beyond that, I have a relationship with Fox Sports Net and have just recently put together a package to run during Cardinal Baseball, which blankets a 5-state area.



Nope. Television exclusively. I don't have to sell any other forms. My company has more businesses on television in STL and KC than any other independent ad agency in either market. Radio is inferior to television and don't even get me started on print. You'd have to advertise on all 7 of the top rated radio stations in my markets SIMULTANEOUSLY to get as much penetration into the market as running one schedule on either of my networks. Print isn't even in the same race. Newspapers and trade publications are the fucking Special Olympics of the advertising world and I don't fuck with em.



Not at all. The air times I push are nowhere near "left over". What I do is simple....

I buy airtime directly from the station at cost, just like any other business that advertises does. That airtime is bought in :30 second intervals, and during premier programming (news, prime, daytime rotation, etc).

What I then do is approach small businesses to buy half of those 30-second blocks :)15 seconds). I pair up non-competing businesses to run back to back within those 30-second blocks of airtime.

So how do I make money?

Simple; If a 30 second block of airtime over the course of a year costs 30 grand, I divide those blocks in two, and charge 18 grand to two businesses, thus making myself a cool six grand (minus production fees) on the back end for doing little more than convincing a business that television is the best vehicle to advertise (which isn't hard to do, because it is).



There is no better form of advertising than television. Period. That's why it's so expensive.
Ok . .I'm more impressed with what you're doing since its not just dumping the shit spots on small businesses who can't afford preferred placement.

I do giggle at the notion that TV is the best form of advertising. Of course you say that because you're in TV. I always said that Newspaper was the best form of advertising when I was in the newspaper business. I'll disagree that TV is the best and I don't think Newspaper is best in my market. Actually I state each product and market probably has a unique vehicle that is best for it. And even stating that. . .if you don't mix you're media you're dead in the water. I do find is interesting that most Ad Agency's don't push TV at all and I've been told by 3 different ones in the last year its not worth the money spent to produce and run a commercial spot for 99.9% of businesses.
 

Kill_em_All

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I do giggle at the notion that TV is the best form of advertising. Of course you say that because you're in TV.
I'm not saying it because I'm in television. I'm saying it because I've done the research. A.C. Nielson provides the best possible numbers for comparison between television and other vehicles of advertisement and the numbers don't lie.

This isn't always the case. Each market is a little different. Obviously if you're in some po-dunk, rural hick town, broadcast media isn't always going to be atop the list. In that scenario, radio or Alternative Direct Broadcast (satellite television) would place highest. But with respect to all 35 major US markets, there isn't anything that comes remotely close to televsion given that the particular station a business running on isn't a dud.

That last part is very important. For instance, KDNL (the ABC affiliate in St. Louis) is the lowest ranking ABC affiliate in the entire nation. If a company is considering advertising on that affiliate, I'll tell them that they'd have a better chance reaching the public standing on top of their building in their underwear shouting into a fucking megaphone.

My STL station's OVERNIGHT schedule gets more viewers than the ABC affiliate's top-ranked program (Good Morning America). That's saying something.

if you don't mix you're media you're dead in the water.
I disagree, whole heartedly. I'm telling all of my clients to ask all of their media reps they subscribe to if they have a 97 percent penetration into the market. If the answer is no, I instruct them to politely tell their reps to batter their genitals with saliva.

Nobody reads fucking newspapers anymore, the Yellow Pages is the definition of antiquity, and unless you're pounding away at radio on all the major stations in your market, there is no need for a multi-faceted marketing program.

I do find is interesting that most Ad Agency's don't push TV at all and I've been told by 3 different ones in the last year its not worth the money spent to produce and run a commercial spot for 99.9% of businesses.
Any advertising agency that doesn't reccommend television is a fucking joke. The one thing I've learned about most agencies during my tenure in this business is that they're all bloated, egomaniacal, know-it-all, douchebags with about as much knowledge of their market as a fucking corpse has of text messaging.

The main reason that agencies don't reccommend television is because the agency commission isn't worth the effort. If they work their asses off to sell 50k in television advertisements for one of their clients, and they only get a 7.5 percent commission cut (which is actually the high end. Most agencies only get about a 3 or 5 percent cut on TV) they're putting in a bunch of work for no payoff. But when they can push a 15 percent cut off a 40k yellow page ad, or a 20 percent cut on radio, they're going to jump to it like fuckin Richard Simmonds on methanphetamine.

It's people like me, who push television exclusively and don't work for commission (and actually give a shit about my clients) that will tell my clients the truth who come out on top. While most businesses are struggling in this economy, we're thriving. Thriving isn't even the best word. There should be a new word to describe how well we're actually doing, like Prospriving, or something. Beyond that, our clients are all prospering. The automotive industry is a wreck right now, but I have a Toyota dealership and a Dodge dealership that have both recorded consistent profit during this whole economic fiasco. I've made (not including the 25k that I'll be getting back from this particular client) close to 45 thousand dollars so far in the first quarter. If our sales projections are tight (which they generally are), I'll be on par to make damn near 300k by year's end, which will make this the most profitable year of my entire life (and I've had some good years prior to this).

There's a reason for my success, G; TV works. :D