Which of these shapes is Bouba and which is Kiki?

Wenis

Hello Ladies.
Feb 18, 2009
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You have to name these shapes and have two options, Bouba and Kiki.

Got an idea? :smiles:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synesthesia#Links_with_other_areas_of_study

In 2001, Vilayanur S. Ramachandran and Edward Hubbard repeated Köhler's experiment using the words "kiki" and "bouba" and asked American college undergraduates and Tamil speakers in India "Which of these shapes is bouba and which is kiki?" In both the English and the Tamil speakers, 95% to 98% selected the curvy shape as "bouba" and the jagged one as "kiki", suggesting that the human brain is somehow able to extract abstract properties from the shapes and sounds.

Ramachandran and Hubbard suggest that the kiki/bouba effect has implications for the evolution of language, because it suggests that the naming of objects is not completely arbitrary.
 

SlimSkeeter

Guest
I thought "bouba" for the curvy object because it sounded vaguely like "bulbous"....which only left one other word and object.

The Wiki article mentions:
The rounded shape may intuitively be named bouba because the mouth makes a more rounded shape to produce that sound, while a more taut, angular mouth shape is needed to articulate kiki. The sound of K is also harder and more forceful than that of B.
Makes a strange kind of sense to me. After all, listening to little children start to name things in their world, it's fairly remarkable how similar some things are.
 

Mamba

Uranium
Founder
May 22, 2008
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Yeah, I thought the same bouba like blob, or bauble.... and kiki like sharp...
 

KommieKat

Mao's Pet Cat
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Mar 2, 2008
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Hong Kong, hiding from the Kommies!
How about Gendered languages like German, French and Spanish?

Would a German bridge (feminine, die Brucke) be different is design compared to a Spanish (masculine, el puente)?

If a French speaker were to give a human voice to a fork (la fourchette), would it be feminine?
If a Spanish speaker were to do the same (el tenedor) would it be masculine?

Does a gender system of speaking influence fashion, habits and preferences?
 

SlimSkeeter

Guest
How about Gendered languages like German, French and Spanish?

Would a German bridge (feminine, die Brucke) be different is design compared to a Spanish (masculine, el puente)?

If a French speaker were to give a human voice to a fork (la fourchette), would it be feminine?
If a Spanish speaker were to do the same (el tenedor) would it be masculine?

Does a gender system of speaking influence fashion, habits and preferences?
hmm...coming at it from a different direction, eh? I suppose that, given the gender differentiation of certain languages reveal a certain bias regarding objects. Some are the opposite of what I would have done. El gato (cat) for instance. I look at cats and see sleek and agile creatures and I think they are more feminine in form.
 

Copernicus

Noob a little less
Jul 27, 2010
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I chose the names the same way, but not Bouba for "bulbous", but, rather, because "Bouba" sounded "soft", while "K's" are a hard sound which I acquainted with the sharp edges
 

NiBBler

boop!
Dec 10, 2008
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I chose the opposite. Go figure. To me Bouba sounded masculine, which was the sharp pic and Kikki sounded femine.. the flowery shape.